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Detailing Texas’ standard possession order guidelines

Children in San Antonio have been shown to benefit from having both the influence of a father and mother in their lives. Yet with the U.S. Census Bureau reporting that over 26 percent of children in the U.S. live in homes with only one of their parents present, filling that need for parental guidance from both sides may be difficult. Texas law encourages both parents to remain in constant contact with their children following divorce. Thus the need for a standard possession order.

An SPO specifies the times that both the managing and possessory conservators will have physical custody of their children, either following terms that were mutually agreed upon or determined by the court. Should parents not come to an agreement on their own, the Texas Family Code has its own standards for different scenarios, including when the parents live less than 100 miles apart from each other. In this case, the possessory conservator gets the kids every other weekend throughout the year, beginning at 6 p.m. on Friday and ending at 6 p.m. on Sunday. He or she can also have the kids on every Thursday evening during the school year from 6 p.m.-8 p.m.

The state’s SPO standards also allow the possessory conservator custody from 6 p.m. on the day that school is dismissed for spring break until 6 p.m. the day before it resumes on all even-numbered years. They also allow the possessory conservator to have custody of the children for 30 days during summer break, either consecutively or in no more than two periods. The managing conservator may also petition to have extended custody during this time of either a weekend during which the kids would normally be with the other parent or a weekend during the other’s extended 30 day period of custody. 

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