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Posts tagged "Military Family Law"

Retaining FSGLI coverage following divorce

Oftentimes, the spouses of the service members working at any of the many military installations found near San Antonio put their own careers and professional pursuits on hold to support the work of their significant others. This is often only possible thanks to the many benefits that they enjoy on top of their service member spouses' salaries. Given their dependency on their spouses' support, it may come as little surprise to learn that one of the most valued military benefits is life insurance. On top of the coverage that service members receive as part of their regular pay and benefits, their families may also secure additional coverage at discounted rates through Family Service members Group Life Insurance. According to the website MilitaryBenefits.info, such coverage pays qualifying spouses up to $100,000 in the event of a service member's death. 

Defining Dependency and Indemnity Compensation

As a member of the military in San Antonio, the potential of you losing your life in the execution of your duties is ever present. Countless clients in your situation have come to us here at The Law Office of Roland R. Esparza, P.C. concerned about how their dependents will be taken care of should something like that happen. Survivor benefits are indeed available to help cover the cost of your funeral, as well as life insurance offering payouts of up to $400,000. While such assistance will indeed help your family, how are they to support themselves in your absence in you were the primary breadwinner? 

What is the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act?

As a member of the military in San Antonio, you are likely well aware of the challenges that fulfilling your service obligations can present to both you and your family. One such challenge can be the potential for strain on your relationship with your significant other. If he or she allows such strain to prompt him or her to seek a divorce, your duties could make responding to such a petition in a timely matter difficult, especially if you are on active duty. Fortunately, the law does account for your service and offer you some added freedoms in such a scenario.

Easing into your reintegration after a deployment

If you are like most military members in San Antonio who are also divorced parents, the prospect of deployment can be a significant source of stress. Compared to those concerns, the thought of coming home will likely solicit feelings of joy. Yet we here at The Law Office of Roland R. Esparza, P.C. can attest to the fact that reintegration following a deployment can also be a stressful process.

Caring for your grandkids while their parent is deployed

As a grandparent in San Antonio, maintaining contact with your grandchildren following the divorce of your adult child can be a challenge. That challenge may become even more difficult if your son or daughter is a member of the military and subject to deployment. Many in your same situation have come to us here at The Law Office of Roland R. Esparza, P.C. worried that they will not be able to see their grandchildren while the kids’ mom or dad is away. If your son or daughter shares a rocky relationship with his or her ex-spouse, you may have the same concern.

Can your family get custody of your kids after you are deployed?

Being away from your kids while you are on deployment may be extremely difficult. Your situation may be even more stressful if you have reason to worry about their safety in San Antonio while you are away. If your ex-spouse has been granted custody of your children while you are deployed, yet you think that his or her conduct could put them at risk, is there a way for you to request that temporary emergency custody be given to another?

Defining the different types of military assignments

Your military service may often take you away from San Antonio for extended periods of time. This may cause you great concern if you happen to be dealing with child custody issues. Many in your same situation have come to us here at The Law Office of Roland R. Esparza, P.C. prior to leaving for military service questioning how their absence may affect their custody status. Their fears (as well as yours) likely come from the knowledge that a military assignment can last anywhere from several weeks to a few years.

How long will your kids remain eligible for TRICARE?

If you are a military service member in San Antonio that is currently going through a divorce, then you may be wondering what sort of benefits that your ex-spouse and children will receive once your marriage has legally ended. Of all of the benefits that service members and their families receive, one of the most valued may be health insurance coverage through TRICARE (given the high cost of health care). Once your divorced is finalized, your ex-spouse’s TRICARE coverage ends at 12:01 that very day. Yet what about your kids?

Understanding the Continued Health Care Benefit Program

The stresses involved with being in a military marriage in San Antonio can exact quite a toll on the civilian spouse. While the benefits that he or she might enjoy through his or her service member may be beneficial, having to deal with issues such as the potential for deployment may outweigh those advantages. Indeed, information shared by Military.com shows that prior to 2001, military divorce rates were only at 2.6 percent. That number climbed to 3.7 percent in 2011, and was still at 3 percent as of 2015. Yet for those civilian spouses who do choose to end their military marriages, the question of how they will deal with the loss of their benefits looms large.

How do family courts view your military allowances?

As a member of the military in San Antonio, you are likely very familiar with reasons behind your current military pay scale placement. However, if you also happen to be a spouse (or a parent) that is in the process of filing for divorce, you may not know exactly how the court views your income status when determining things such as alimony or child support. Military members receive added benefits on top of their regular pay which many view as offering income advantages not enjoyed by civilians. The question is whether or not those benefits affect the amount the court considers when determining your potential child and spousal support obligations.