Law Office of Roland R. Esparza, P.C.

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Relocation and child custody

Given that divorce and other significant life events often compel people to move, the attorneys at the Law Office of Roland R. Esparza, P.C., can attest to the fact that child custody disputes over relocation are not uncommon. If you have physical custody of your child and are considering a big move, it can be helpful to know what factors may be taken into consideration by the Texas family law court in granting your request for child custody modifications. It is also important for you, as the non-custodial parent, to understand your rights in preventing your child from moving.

As About Parenting explains, determining the best interests of the child is at the heart of every relocation dispute. As a result, the court may agree with your opinion, as the child’s non-custodial, that moving with his or her other parent is not the best course of action. That is why the burden of proof typically falls on the custodial parent to illustrate why and how the child would benefit from moving.

It is largely your responsibility as the custodial parent, therefore, to convince the court that your interest in relocating is based on your child’s current and future needs. For instance, it may be necessary to show that your child will have access to equal or better educational and recreational opportunities in your new community. Beyond that, the court will likely want to be assured that the move will not compromise the child’s relationship with his or her other parent. Offering a plan that allows for appropriate visitation opportunities between your child and his or her noncustodial parent can help bolster your case for wanting to move.

Learn more about relocation and other child custody topics by visiting our web page today.

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