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Understanding adult child support

Most in San Antonio may likely assume that those paying child support are only required to do so until their children are old enough to provide for themselves. In most cases, that assumption would be correct. Texas law typically ends one’s child support obligations when his or her children marry or reach the age of 18. Yet what of those children who are disabled? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 53 American adults live with some form of disability. Reaching a certain age may not necessarily guarantee them the sudden ability to support themselves.

For those disabled people whose needs were seen to through child support as children, the need for continued financial assistance many continue once they reach adulthood. Texas state law allows for a child support obligation to be extended in such circumstances, provided that the supported person meets its definition of being disabled. Its criteria include one not being capable of self-support who requires both substantial care and personal supervision due to a mental or physical disability. To qualify for continued support, it must also be shown that the disability (or the cause of a subsequent disabling condition) was known to have existed on or before one's eighteenth birthday.

In most cases, one parent is designated as the guardian of an adult child with a disability. That parent will typically be the party to whom the continuing child support is paid (however, the court may choose to require both parents to pay support if it is deemed to be necessary). The court could also allow such payments to go directly to the adult child that they are meant to support.

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